Adolphe Landspurg
the art of dowsing - radiestasy - geobiology - geomancy
The art of the Dowser from Antiquity to the Modern Day
Frescos of ancient Egypt showing dowsers in action
Frescos of ancient Egypt showing dowsers in action

The art of the dowser, formerly known as “rhabdomancy” from the Creek rhabdos word meaning rod, and manteia meaning divination), has been practised since Ancient times. Certain engravings of the Tassili in the north of the Sahara engraved 8000 years ago represent dowsers in action. The Eskimos, the Sumeriens, the Egyptians, Chaldeans, the Hebrews, the Brahmans of India, the Celts, the Greeks, the Germans and the Romans had dowsers among their priests, their leaders and guides.. One of the most well known is Moses, the Hebrew leader who in the year 1250 before Jesus Christ sought water in the desert of the Sinai using his Staff of leadership.

In years gone by, the kings and princes resorted to using dowsers to detect the underground streams and hidden veins of metal and ores that were hidden underground.

During the reign of king Louis XIII of France, and his statesman the Cardinal Richelieu, the baron de Beausoleil and his wife Martine de Bertereau successfully discovered 150 mines in France using various divining rods. Accused of witchcraft, Martine de Bertereau was sent to the state prison of Vincennes and her husband to the Bastille. In spite of the prohibition by the Church, many Jesuits and priests successfully practised dowsing. In 1693, the Jesuit priest Le Lorrain, professor of physics at the Louis Le Grand college published a book entitled “Occult Physics or Use of the Divining Rod” under the pseudonym of the “Abbot of Vallemont”.

The 26 October, 1701, the book was blacklisted after an investigation by the Inquisition. It was the abbot Bouly, the local priest of Hardelot-Plage, in Pas-de-Calais, France (1865-1968) that gave the art of divining the name of Radiestasy (from the Latin Radius meaning Ray, and the Greek Aisthesis meaning sensitivity). The abbot Mermet (1866-1937), was often solicited to seek out sources on maps as well as thermal springs. In 1948, 1949 and 1952, German doctors Hartmann, Curry and Wissmann discovered telluric networks and gave their names to the grid-like networks that these various telluric lines formed. As part of their analyses and research Geobiologist’s now take into account the Hartmann, Curry and Wissmann networks.

Dowsers in the Middle Ages
Dowsers in the Middle Ages
The search for ores in the 15th Centaury
The search for ores in the 15th Centaury

Adolphe Landspurg
Président de l'Association Géobiologie et Tradition
13, rue des Alouettes
F-68360 Soultz
adolphe@landspurg.com