Adolphe Landspurg
the art of dowsing - radiestasy - geobiology - geomancy
The work and materials of the dowser in the third millennium
Waterfinder operating with naked hands looking for an underground river. It will be confirmed with a gratuated antenna
Waterfinder operating with naked hands looking for an underground river. It will be confirmed with a gratuated antenna.

The divining rod or the V sharped forked cut in hazel tree, reed, olive-tree or fig tree is replaced nowadays by the plastic rod, the L aerials called "radmaster" and the graduated antennas of which the most known is the Lecher one.

Some country side waterfinders operating with naked hands feel something like tickles when arriving at the vertical of an underground river. Others operate using a pendulum, small wooden ball, metal or stone suspended with a string or a chain which the radiesthesist holds between the inch and the index. He advances on the ground while making his pendulum oscillate. While passing above an underground river, the pendulum ceases oscillating and starts to turn while indicating the direction. A good dowser can detect a subsoil water vein on a plan where the north is indicated while making use of a pendulum and a compass. He can use a graduated Lecher antenna by sweeping the plan from to south and from east to west by holding the antenna 10 cm above the plan. The L aerials were already used at the time of the Sumérans in 2000 BC.

Those which I currently use consist of two curved brass stems forming a right angle swivelling around a hollow coppertube of a slightly higher diameter. The vertical copper parts that I hold between my hands remain fixed whereas the brass stems with right angles out are mobile around the axis. The length of the horizontal stems is the double of the vertical ones for example, 30 cm, 15 cm, 24 cm, 12 cm, etc.

The gesture of the dowser is simple. It consists in holding the hazel stick, metal or plastic between his hands, and to advance on the ground by forming a V and by exerting a light pressure to maintain it parallel to the ground. When he passes at the vertical of a bank or an underground river the rod will react and twist. A good dowser can determine the banks, the width, the direction of the current, his depth as well as his flow.

Nowdays dowser are asked for the search for sources and underground rivers, for the geobiologic analysis of the grounds before buiding, for the detection and the harmonization of the harmful waves in the apartments, offices, workshops and houses.

Instruments of the waterfinders, radiesthesists and geobiologists
Instruments of the waterfinders, radiesthesists and geobiologists

Various pendulums used by the waterfinders, radiesthesists and geobiologists
Various pendulums used by the waterfinders, radiesthesists and geobiologists

Adolphe Landspurg
Président de l'Association Géobiologie et Tradition
13, rue des Alouettes
F-68360 Soultz
adolphe@landspurg.com